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  From Vice –chancellor’s desk:-
   
 

The Eastern India region including Jharkhand, Bihar, Orissa, Chhattisgarh, West Bengal, Assam and Eastern U.P. has the potential to usher in the second Green Revolution in the country. This will be realized if the challenges in the form of low productivity, erratic climatic conditions, inadequate support and infrastructural facilities are addressed. The growing need for food and the flattening yield levels in Punjab and Haryana while posing a problem, is at the same time an opportunity. Rice is the major crop in the region alongwith other important crops like maize, pulses, oilseeds & wheat. While initiatives are underway for enhancing productivity in different agro-ecological sub regions, the challenges are daunting. The effective way forward would be to constantly explore newer options to meet the twin objectives of enhancing production & productivity.

There must be special emphasis on technologies that would benefit the resource poor and marginal farmers, especially from the tribal populations. A program that is truly inclusive with benefits trickling down to the poorest would be the key essentiality. The Birsa Agricultural University has the unique advantage in terms of its location and long history. It looks forward to demonstrate the great transformational power of agriculture in the region. The backward & forward linkages to strengthen the value chain in agriculture, secondary agriculture and agro industry would be crucial. The University would strive to equip its students with good technical and communication skills, make them job ready with the potential to evolve into job providers and be ambassadors of the University.

It is hoped that the synergy generated by the efforts of all stakeholders would be a harbinger leading to great benefits for the state of Jharkhand.

The state of Jharkhand came into existence on 15th November 2000 as 28th State carved out from erstwhile state of Bihar.  As per the constitution of India, the major parts of the state falls under schedule V with hilly and difficult terrain covered with forest. The total population is approximately 3.29 crores. Jharkhand as a state is known for vast reservoir of natural resources in terms of forest areas as well as minerals. The state is basically tribal dominated having nearly 27 percent scheduled tribes and 11 percent scheduled castes (Dalit) population. There are 30 tribal groups in Jharkhand. The Government of India identified total 75 tribal communities as Primitive Tribal Groups (PTGs) in India and Jharkhand is inhabited by nine PTGs in Jharkhand (Asur, Birhor, Birjia, Hill Kharia, Korwa, Mal Paharia, Sauria Paharia, Parahiya, and Savar). As the PTGs live in more interior pockets which are generally inaccessible and with declining sources of sustenance, they become more vulnerable to hunger/starvation, malnutrition and ill-health. Some of them are even on the verge of extinction.

Inspite of agriculture being a major source of livelihood, the productivity as well as profitability in agriculture have significantly been low in the state. While the low productivity can be attributed to illiteracy, lack of awareness, poor dissemination of technology, inadequate investment in agricultural inputs and poor communication and information services, lack of profitability is mainly due to inadequate and inefficient infrastructure required for forward and backward integration, poor post harvest and processing facilities and poor connectivity with market, resulting in exploitation by large number of middlemen. In the absence of local entrepreneurship, the opportunities in agriculture are hijacked by outsiders, particularly the urban businessmen and traders, leading to exploitation and deprivation of employment for the farmers. Considering the growing unemployment in rural areas and slow growth of the agricultural sector, it is necessary to tap the opportunities for promoting entrepreneurship in agriculture, which in turn can address the present problems related to agricultural production and profitability. There is a need for efficient support organizations to monitor the activities of small enterprises. Prediction of the future demand, introduction of modern technologies, cost control and business expansions are the important areas, where entrepreneurs need regular support. Suitable legal support may also be required to protect the traders engaged in unfair trade practices.

The Birsa Agricultural University, Ranchi has been entrusted by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi to execute a project under National Agricultural Innovation Project (NAIP) entitled "Business Planning and Development (BPD) Unit" in 2009 at BAU, Ranchi with the objective to develop entrepreneurship at local level using commercially viable technologies in order to promote agriculture as industry and not as a means for livelihood only. The BPD unit is helping to promote entrepreneurship through skill enhancement and forward and backward linkages with the stakeholders involved in the chain. After facing initial constraints at various levels, the BPD unit has been able to make its impact in terms of commercialization of technologies and development of entrepreneurship. I am sure that other entrepreneur would also be motivated to commercialize the already existing/new technologies in order to boost secondary agriculture in the state.

Dr. Parvinder Kaushal

 

 

Copyright ® 2010 BAU (Business Planning Development)
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